Individual Notes

Note for:   Bartholomew DUPUY,    -          Index

Alias:   /DUPEE/

Individual Note:
     Moved to Woodford Co, KY.

Individual Notes

Note for:   Joel MOTLEY,    -          Index

Individual Note:
     According to Pritchett, this Joel was an orphan who was bound out to John McLachlin, a tailor, in Amelia County in 1786.

Individual Notes

Note for:   Isaac MOTLEY,    -          Index

Individual Note:
     Moved to Prince Edward County, VA.

Individual Notes

Note for:   Polly MOTLEY,    -          Index

Individual Note:
     According to Pritchett, was an orphan, placed under guardianship of Thomas Elmore, in 1786.

Individual Notes

Note for:   John H. GOLDSMITH,   28 FEB 1839 -          Index

Individual Note:
     From the Morgan County, IL Rootsweb site: ANOTHER PIONEER PASSES AWAY
J. H. Goldsmith, One of Waverly's Respected Citizens Succumbs To Heart Failure John H. Goldsmith was born February 28th 1839, near Pisgah, Ill., and died at his home in Waverly, Ill., Tuesday, November 14th, 1911, at 1:30 p.m., aged 72 years, 8 months and 14 days. His health had been failing for about a year as a result of heart trouble and only a month ago he was obliged to resign as city clerk on that account. His death came sudden and rather unexpected. He had eaten his dinner as usual and afterward had taken a short walk in the yard, when he returned into the house and remarked that he was feeling badly, and after being assisted to bed, he at once lost consciousness, and lived only a few moments.
He was married in Waverly, Ill., November 7th, 1871, to Miss Nannie B. Morris. To this union were born three sons, as follows: Bert M., born December 13, 1875; Branch P., born November 28, 1880; and George B., born April 25, 1883. The oldest, Bert, died several years ago by drowning in Illinois river. His wife and two sons survive, besides three sisters, Mrs. M. E. Rogers of this city; Miss Ella E. Goldsmith of Chicago; and Mrs. Anna Ainsworth of Havana, Ill. He united with the First Baptist church in this city in the year 1873, and remained a member until his death.
Mr. Goldsmith had the distinction of being the first city clerk of Waverly, the election occurring April 16, 1878, upon the city's first adoption, and during his life held four terms as such. His ability in this office was shown by the accurate and straight-forward manner in which he conducted the duties connected with it, and he was recognized as the best clerk the city ever had. He enlisted in Co. E, 14th Illinois Volunteer Infantry at Petersburg, Illinois, May 25, 1861, as a soldier in the Civil War, and served until the close of the war. He was taken prisoner and confined in the famous and horrible Andersonville prison for a period of six months. The deceased was a man of exceptional ability, talented, a great reader, and unusually versed on the topics of the day. He was an interesting conversant, and took exceeding pleasure in giving information and advice to all who desired. Just a few days before he died he remarked to his wife that he was ready to go and had nothing to regret.
He was one of Waverly's pioneers, respected by all its citizens, and his absence from among us will be universally regretted but his memory will ever be cherished. Funeral services were conducted at the First Baptist church, Thursday, Nov. 16, at 2:30 in the afternoon, Rev. P. H. Aldrich, pastor, delivering the sermon. The funeral ceremonies were under the direction of the two orders of which he was a member. In his youth he acquired the printer's trade and was employed on the Illinois State Register for several years. He then returned to Waverly and established the "Waverly Times" in the seventies, and a few years later his paper was purchased by M. M. Meacham, Mr. Goldsmith accepting a position with the new proprietor, remaining with him until Mr. Meacham disposed of his interests to Mr. F. B. Ritchie. In the course of several years he took a position with Mr. Ritchie, and from time to time was connected with the paper in a practical and journalistic way up to about nine months ago. "Uncle" John, as the writers best knew him, took special pride in remarking that his was a long and steady record as a printer, having rounded out over 50 years at the trade. He was Commander of the John W. Ross Post, G. A. R. at the time of his death, and a member of the Modern Woodmen. No. 138.